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Should the Military Intervene in Syria?

As the intensity of the civil war does not seem to decrease, would it be time for the international community to consider military intervention in Syria?

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The civil war in Syria has gone on for over two years now, without much advancement toward any sort of settlement. Thousands were found dead on the ground, other wounded, and the number of emigrants is also rapidly growing, causing concerns to neighboring countries.


Emigration from Syria to neighbouring countries is growing fast

Emigration from Syria to neighbouring countries is growing fast

Neither side seems to be ready for a settlement. When the people demanded reforms, Assad refused. Then as clashes intensified, Assad would have agreed to carry out democratic reforms and give in to the will of the Syrian people. Then again, the people’s rage was way over the point of accepting any compromise, and claimed that Assad’s offer came too late. This attitude on both sides entrenched ongoing civil war in Syria. Given the intermittent nature of this rebellion, one question arises: should the UN and the NATO finally consider military intervention in Syria?

We can argue both pro and cons. There are a whole lot of arguments for both, which all have underlying political and economic dimensions as well. A general assumption is that Syria is much more densely populated than Libya, therefore it would be much more difficult to have a larger portion of the country under rebel control. Yet if there were a clear decision to step up against Assad, this would matter less.

Yet when talking about the UN, we should also not forget its operation structure: even one single vote of a permanent member (China, Russia, US, France, United Kingdom) can hinder any action. Therefore it is difficult to achieve any military intervention in Syria if China and Russia both veto this decision. Both countries have established economic relations with the Assad regime, and Russia have been always behind the Syrian government in the past decades. It would therefore be hard to relinquish economic advantages in the favour of humanitarian needs.

Now given the inability of the UN to get to a consensus on military intervention in Syria, the NATO remains. The NATO itself includes America and western countries, but its partnerships go across the globe, linking most of Europe and Asia to the organisation, in one way or another. The latest NATO intervention was the one recently operated in Libya, in 2011, codenamed “Operation Unified Protector”.

So what is the difference between Libya and Syria that the NATO was ready to intervene in Libya but hesitates to do the same in Syria? There have been equal bloodshed in both countries, equal suffering and equal need for outside help, yet it seems the organisation favoured the “liberation” of Libya and not that of Syria. This most probably reflects the US need for oil – which can be found in Libya but not in Syria. For the same matter, we could also talk about the intervention in Iraq which turned out to be useless and lacked solid foundations – still, nobody ever condemned America for that. Moreover, Assad is still safer than Qaddafi used to be. Although as a general rule, the evil one knows is better than the evil one does not know, the situation in Libya added to the need for oil and the already difficult relation with Qaddafi made the intervention less risky than military intervention in Syria.

A young rebel in Syria's streets

A young rebel in Syria’s streets

 

Another explanation would be that the Syrian war already created two blocks: one favouring intervention (this including mostly Western countries, and the US to a certain extent), and one against intervention (China, Russia, Iran). In case the “Western bloc” would arm the rebels, it would soon drag the other bloc into the war more fervently, channelling arms and manpower into Syria to support the Assad regime. Most likely, Iran would provide manpower while Russia and China would provide the arms. Then again, this may lead to an ever bigger scale of civil war and even more bloodshed. Therefore, simply sending arms to the rebels will not do the job of saving Syria. As David Roberts argues, using economic and trade restrictions against the government would be an option, maybe better than arming the rebels, but there is no reason to think that the supporters of the Assad regime would not help them out with any supplies, further isolating the civilian rebels.

 

Now a military intervention in Syria is becoming inevitable, but seemingly UN and NATO intervention is, in turn, becoming impossible. If not the UN or the NATO, the Arab bloc should act finally as one to save the Syrian people and bring down Assad to end the ongoing

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Prison Guards Doesn’t Notice Inmate Getting Murdered by His Cellmate

Following the conviction of one inmate for killing another in an Ontario prison four years ago, Canadian authorities have released video footage that captures the behavior of a guard and other prisoners in the moments that preceded and the moments that followed the victim’s murder.

TUT Staff

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Following the conviction of one inmate for killing another in an Ontario prison four years ago, Canadian authorities have released video footage that captures the behavior of a guard and other prisoners in the moments that preceded and the moments that followed the victim’s murder.


On October 31, 2013, Adam Kargus, 29, was choked, punched, kicked and stomped to death in a cell. Although there is no proof that the actions of his attacker, Anthony George, 32, were detected, a recording taken from the area outside of the cell appears to show a guard walk by as the incident was unfolding. Although the video released to the public blurs it out, it is reported that investigators reviewing the footage were able to see the violence taking place through the cell window. The video then cuts to George later dragging Kargus’ bagged body out of the cell towards one of the Elgin Middlesex Detention Centre’s showers, without the guards noticing.

According to an autopsy done on Kargus’ remains, he reportedly died of blunt force trauma to the head, face, and neck. George told the court that he was intoxicated off of a concoction he made out of toilet water and fermented fruit when he went on his rampage. He has been sentenced to life, but may be eligible for parole in 10 years.

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5 People Finally Arrested in 1983 Racially Motivated Murder of 23-Year-Old Black Man

The family of Timothy Coggins may finally receive justice, over three decades later.

TUT Staff

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Suspects of a racially motivated murder of a black man 34 years ago have finally been arrested in Georgia. Frankie Gebhardt, Bill Moore Sr., Sandra Bunn, Lamar Bunn, and Gregory Huffman were all arrested in connection with the murder of Timothy Coggins. Coggins was found dead on October 9th, 1983 in Sunnyside, Georgia as a result of multiple forms of trauma. All five suspects are white.


The search for the suspects went cold until March of this year when new evidence came to light. Original witnesses were re-interviewed, which also lead to new information for the case. Police stated that many witnesses were, “living with this information since Coggins’ death but had been afraid to come forward or had not spoken of it until now.”

Frankie Gebhardt and Bill Moore were arrested and charged with murder, felony murder, aggravated assault, aggravated battery and concealing the death of another. Sandra Bunn. Lamar Bunn and Gregory Huffman were charged with the lesser charge of obstruction.

Coggins’ family thanked the police for re-opening the case saying, “We know that there’s been tireless nights and we know that you guys have put in so many hours making sure that these people were brought to justice…The only unfortunate part in this is that our grandparents, Timothy Coggins’ parents, are not able to see this today.”

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231 People Are Dead in Somalian Terrorist Attack

At least 231 are dead in what is now the deadliest attack in Somalia’s history.

TUT Staff

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The death toll from the bomb blast in Somalia’s capital of Mogadishu has risen to 231 with more than 200 people injured, making it the deadliest terrorist attack in Somalia’s history.


Hundreds more were wounded when a military vehicle packed with explosives detonated near the entrance of a hotel. Doctors struggled to help terribly wounded victims, many burnt beyond recognition. Officials feared the toll would continue to climb from Saturday’s truck bomb that targeted a busy street near key ministries.

Some of the victims died in their cars and in public transportation vehicles. “There was a traffic jam, and the road was packed with bystanders and cars,” a waiter at a nearby restaurant said on Saturday. “It’s a disaster.” Erdogan Hospital, one of six hospitals that received wounded victims, said at least 127 people had been brought there for treatment.

It’s not clear who staged the bombing, but Mogadishu is a known target for al-Shabab militants battling the government. President Mohamed Abdullahi “Farmajo” Mohamed has declared three days of mourning for the victims of the blast. Police official, Ibrahim Mohamed, told AFP news agency the death toll is likely to rise. “There are more than 300 wounded, some of them seriously,” he said.

The United States released a statement saying, “such cowardly attacks reinvigorate the commitment of the United States to assist our Somali and African Union partners to combat the scourge of terrorism.” The US military has also stepped up drone strikes and other efforts this year against al-Shabab.

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